In Photographs | The period interior of a York Terrace House

Property age tends to have the biggest effect on the look and feel of a property. There will, of course, always be exceptions with contemporary conversions of old building and new build ‘mock’ architecture switching things around and throwing off your preconceptions made on age alone. This beautiful York terrace had period charm abounds. Detailed architraves, cornices, dressers, balustrades, fireplaces, the list went on and on. It can sometimes be difficult to carry a properties charm across in photographs and this is where using a good professional photographer pays dividends. Every house has to be approached on its own. While there are ‘rules’ that can be applied to photographing interiors that will give you acceptable photographs in most properties, we aren’t looking to produce acceptable imagery. Our aim is produce work that really gets to a property’s soul. The kind of photographs that don’t just tell what the property looks like but how it feels too. We want to invite you in, to make you imagine a morning croissant at the table in the garden with your coffee. ‘Feel’ is hard to convey in the conventional wide shots of rooms with a basic lighting setup. It can be done in the right house with the right natural light, but usually it requires sophisticated lighting set-ups and tighter crops.

In this York terrace we used a mixture of the conventional wide room shots and tighter ‘peeks’ at interesting details. We added lighting, where necessary, sometimes to supplement existing natural light and at other times (like in the hallway) to create light from scratch that would throw up textures and detail and show off surfaces that would otherwise be poorly rendered on camera. Some period properties are developed to have shutters in the windows. Not only does this keep the classic feeling of the home, it can also help you control the amount of natural light coming in. Some people look at websites, similar to shuttercraft.co.uk, to try and find the right shutters for their home. If you’re trying to create a property perfect for photographing, being able to adjust the natural lighting for photographs is an added benefit of having shutters. Although, the old saying of quality [of light] of over quantity is as true in photography as anywhere else.